#INDIAN ARCHITECT

BRINDA SOMAYA

Brinda Chinnappa Somaya, Architect and Urban Conservationist completed her Master of Arts degree from Smith College, USA after graduating from the Sir J. J. College of Architecture, Mumbai. She believes that development and progress must proceed without straining the cultural and historic envronment. Her philosophy: the Architect’s role is that of guardian – his is the conscience of the built and un-built environment.

This belief underlines her work at “Somaya and Kalappa”, the company she founded and has headed for the last three decades. Her oeuvre, spanning corporate, industrial and institutional clients extends to public spaces, which she has rebuilt and sometimes reinvented as pavements, parks and plazas. These include the Colaba Woods, Ganeshpuri Temple and a slew of pavements in South Mumbai & the reconstruction of an entire village in Kutch. She has done the master planning and building design of multiple corporate and educational campuses. Some of these award winning campuses include the Tata Consultancy Services – Banyan Park, Mumbai, the Nalanda International School, Vadodara, the Zensar Technologies limited, Pune. Other campuses include the Goa Institute of management and the Birla Institute of Technology and Sciences, Pilani

She has won numerous personal and professional awards through the years.But perhaps one of her most fulfilling involvement has been in Progressive Conservation – best exemplified in the restoration and renovation of her alma mater, the Cathedral and John Connon Schools, prime examples of Victorian Gothic architecture in the historic precinct of the Fort area, Mumbai. An example of how the future can be embraced without erasing the past, this conservation effort embodies, in microcosm, what other historic areas of the city might do to renew themselves and by extension, the city, through focused environment-conscious (and history-sensitive) architecture. She emphasizes time and again that her involvement in conservation is neither self indulgent nor reverential, but an intelligent meshing of the old and new to develop an architectural form that serves the present.

Brinda Somaya has delivered analytical and critical talks as well as presented papers in India and abroad on Conservation, Women in Architecture, the changing role of Indian Architects and innumerable other subjects.

Brinda Somaya is also a founder trustee of the HECAR Foundation and has chaired the highly successful conference and exhibition on the work of Women Architects with a focus on South Asia. The HECAR foundationhas also brought out verious books on architecture

INTERNATIONAL AWARDS

  • SEED (SOCIAL ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN) – CHICAGO, U.S.A. COMPETITION SFI 11- 2011
    Honorable mention: rehabilitation of Bhadli village in Bhuj India
  • THE PHAIDON ATLAS OF 21ST CENTURY WORLD ARCHITECTURE – 2008 ALL THE GREATEST BUILDINGS OF THE 21ST CENTURY
    Bhadli village school, Bhuj
  • UIA – VASSILIS SGOUTAS PRIZE 2008
    Alleviation of poverty – honorable mention – Rehabilitation for Bhadli village, Bhuj
  • LEAF AWARDS 2006 WINNER THE LEADING EUROPEAN ARCHITECTS FORUM
    Nalanda International School, Vadodara
  • UNESCO ASIA-PACIFIC HERITAGE AWARDS FOR CULTURE HERITAGE CONSERVATION AWARD OF MERIT 2004
    St.Thomas Cathedral, Mumbai
  • BEST PRACTICES AWARD – 1999
    CAA-IIA International Conference on Urbanization & Housing – II
  • NOMINATED FOR THE AGA KHAN AWARD FOR ARCHITECTURE – 2007
    Nalanda international school, Vadodara
  • NOMINATED FOR THE AGA KHAN AWARD FOR ARCHITECTURE -2007
    Rehabilitation of Bhadli village, Kutch

INDIAN AWARDS

  • SCHOOL OF PLANNING AND ARCHITECTURE: VIJAYAWADA, 2011
    COMPETITION FOR “CAMPUS DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL OF PLANNING AND ARCHITECTURE: VIJAYAWADA”
    AWARDED SECOND PRIZE
  • INDIA’S TOP 10 ARCHITECTS
    CONSTRUCTION WORLD ARCHITECT & BUILDER AWARDS 2009, 2010 & 2011
  • THE WIENERBERGER GOLDEN ARCHITECT AWARD FOR LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT
    THE ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN & SPECTRUM FOUNDATION ARCHITECTURE AWARDS 2007.
  • FELICITATES & HONOURS FOR BEING AN ACHIEVER & AN ICON AMONG WOMEN
    INSTITUTE OF INDIAN INTERIOR DESIGNERS – 2011.
  • CSI ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN EXCELLENCE
    AWARDS 2010
  • VM & RD RETAIL DESIGN AWARDS 2008
    ALAPATT HERITAGE
  • URBAN HERITAGE AWARDS 2007 (INDIAN HERITAGE SOCIETY – MUMBAI)
    Banyan park, TCS, Andheri.
  • URBAN HERITAGE AWARD 2003 (INDIAN HERITAGE SOCIETY – MUMBA1)
    St. Thomas Cathedral, Mumbai.
  • OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTION TOWARDS INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE – 2003
    MAGNA PUBLICATIONS – SOCIETY INTERIORS
  • J.K. CEMENTS’ – AYA AWARD 2002 – INDIAN STATE ARCHITECTURE AWARD
    The Jubilee church at Sanpada, Navi Mumbai
  • WOMEN ACHIEVERS AWARD – 2001
    WOMEN GRADUATES UNION (INDIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN)
  • THE DESIGNER OF THE YEAR – 1999.
    INTERIORS & LIFESTYLE INDIA – MILLENNIUM EDITION
  • INDIAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS – KITPLY AWARD 1998 FOR “CONSERVATION”.
    The Cathedral & John Connon senior school 1998.
  • JOURNAL OF INDIAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS AWARD 1994 FOR “SHELTER CATEGORY”.
    The Garware house (residential) 1994.

 

 

 

 

 

WORKS

 

#INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECT

Frank Gehry

Frank Gehry

 Frank Gehry
Frank Gehry was born Ephraim Owen Goldberg in Toronto, Canada. He moved with his family to Los Angeles as a teenager in 1947 and later became a naturalized U.S. citizen. His father changed the family’s name to Gehry when the family immigrated. Ephraim adopted the first name Frank in his 20s; since then he has signed his name Frank O. Gehry.

Frank Gehry Biography Photo

Uncertain of his career direction, the teenage Gehry drove a delivery truck to support himself while taking a variety of courses at Los Angeles City College. He took his first architecture courses on a hunch, and became enthralled with the possibilities of the art, although at first he found himself hampered by his relative lack of skill as a draftsman. Sympathetic teachers and an early encounter with modernist architect Raphael Soriano confirmed his career choice. He won scholarships to the University of Southern California and graduated in 1954 with a degree in architecture.

Los Angeles was in the middle of a post-war housing boom and the work of pioneering modernists like Richard Neutra and Rudolph Schindler were an exciting part of the city’s architectural scene. Gehry went to work full-time for the notable Los Angeles firm of Victor Gruen Associates, where he had apprenticed as a student, but his work at Gruen was soon interrupted by compulsory military service. After serving for a year in the United States Army, Gehry entered the Harvard Graduate School of Design, where he studied city planning, but he returned to Los Angeles without completing a graduate degree. He briefly joined the firm of Pereira and Luckman before returning to Victor Gruen. Gruen Associates were highly successful practitioners of the severe utilitarian style of the period, but Gehry was restless. He took his wife and two children to Paris, where he spent a year working in the office of the French architect Andre Remondet and studied firsthand the work of the pioneer modernist Le Corbusier.

Gehry and his family returned to Los Angeles in 1962, and he established his own firm, Gehry Associates, now known as Gehry Partners, LLP. For a number of years, he continued to work in the established International Style, initiated by Le Corbusier and the Bauhaus, but he was increasingly drawn to the avant-garde arts scene growing up around the beach communities of Venice and Santa Monica. He spent more of his time in the company of sculptors and painters like Ed Kienholz, Bob Irwin, Ed Moses and Ed Ruscha, who were finding new uses for the overlooked by-products of industrial civilization. Frank Gehry began to look for an opportunity to express a more personal vision in his own work.

He had his first brush with national attention when some furniture he had built from industrial corrugated cardboard experienced a sudden popularity. The line of furniture, called Easy Edges, was featured in national magazine spreads, and the Los Angeles architect experienced an unexpected notoriety. Although Gehry built imaginative houses for a number of artist friends, including Ruscha, in the 1970s, for most of the decade his larger works were distinguished but relatively conventional buildings such as the Rouse Company headquarters in Columbia, Maryland, and the Santa Monica Place shopping mall.

Frank Gehry Biography Photo

Gehry found a creative outlet in rebuilding his own home, converting what he called “a dumb little house with charm” into a showplace for a radically new style of domestic building. He took common, unlovely elements of American homebuilding, such as chain link fencing, corrugated aluminum and unfinished plywood, and used them as flamboyant expressive elements, while stripping the interior walls of the house to reveal the structural elements. His Santa Monica neighbors were scandalized, but Gehry’s house attracted serious critical attention and he began to employ more imaginative elements in his commercial work. A series of public structures in and around Los Angeles marked his evolution away from orthodox modernist practice, including the Frances Goldwyn Branch Library in Hollywood, the California Aerospace Museum and the Loyola University Law School. A number of his works in this period featured the unusual decorative motif of a Formica fish, and he designed a number of lamps and other objects in the form of snakes and fishes.

Frank Gehry Biography Photo

By the mid ’80s, his work had attracted international attention and he was commissioned to build the Vitra furniture factory in Basel, Switzerland, as well as the Vitra Design Museum in Weil-am-Rhein, Germany. These projects established him as a major presence on the international architecture scene. His buildings displayed a penchant for whimsy and playfulness previously unknown in serious architecture. Most distinctive of all was his ability to explode familiar geometric volumes and reassemble them in original new forms of unprecedented complexity, a practice the critics dubbed “deconstructivism.” His international reputation was confirmed when he received the 1989 Pritzker Prize, the world’s most prestigious architecture award.

Frank Gehry Biography Photo

Although he originally completed his design for the proposed Walt Disney Concert Hall in downtown Los Angeles in 1989, funding shortages and political infighting delayed construction of the project for many years. The Weisman Art Museum at the University of Minnesota, completed in 1990, was to be Gehry’s first monumental work in his own country, a billowing fantasy in brick and stainless steel. Meanwhile, his interest in collaboration with other artists was expressed in the fanciful design for the West Coast headquarters of the advertising firm Chiat Day, in Venice, California. The entrance to the building took the form of a pair of giant binoculars, created by the sculptors Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen.

Frank Gehry Biography Photo

Although his main project for Los Angeles went unbuilt through the ’90s, he completed major projects in a number of other countries. His playful side reappeared in the “Dancing House” in the Czech capital, Prague. Comprising two undulating cylinders on a corner facing the river Vltava, the Czechs nicknamed the building “Fred and Ginger.” His proposal for a museum in Seoul, South Korea, which he discusses in his 1995 interview with the Academy of Achievement, was ultimately rejected, but an even more ambitious undertaking lay just ahead.

Frank Gehry Biography Photo

Gehry’s most spectacular design to date was that of the new Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, completed in 1997. Gehry first envisioned its form, like all his works, through a simple freestyle hand sketch, but breakthroughs in computer software had enabled him to build in increasingly eccentric shapes, sweeping irregular curves that were the antithesis of the severely rectilinear International Style. Traditional modernists criticized the work as arbitrary, or gratuitously eccentric, but distinguished former exponents of the International Style, such as the late Philip Johnson. championed his work, and Gehry became the most visible of an elite cohort of highly publicized “starchitects.” He drew fire again with his design for the Experience Music Project museum in Seattle, but in his adopted home town of Los Angeles, a long-delayed project was reaching fruition.

The year 2004 saw the long-awaited completion of the Walt Disney Concert Hall in downtown Los Angeles. The building opened to great public celebration and immediately became the sprawling city’s landmark building.

Frank Gehry Biography Photo

Although built after his Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, the design actually predated it and featured a similar panoply of exploding titanium. The splayed pipes of the hall’s massive pipe organ were likened by more than one writer to a packet of French fries, but the public response was ecstatic. Gehry’s earlier experience building and renovating concert halls and amphitheaters had paid off in a facility that not only attracted international attention with its striking appearance, but thrilled musicians and listeners with its acoustically brilliant interior.

Frank Gehry Biography Photo

Over the years, Gehry has lent his imaginative designs to a number of products outside the field of architecture, including the Wyborovka Vodka bottle, a wristwatch for Fossil, jewelry for Tiffany & Co. and the World Cup of Hockey trophy. In 2006, the architect and his work were the subject of a feature-length documentary film, Sketches of Frank Gehry, by director Sydney Pollack.

In the following years, Gehry immersed himself in a number of projects, including the Barclays Center sports arena in Brooklyn, New York, a concert hall for the New World Symphony in Miami Beach, and another branch of the Guggenheim Museum in Abu Dhabi. Most ambitious of all is the massive Grand Street project, a plan to entirely remake the thoroughfare leading from Los Angeles City Hall to Disney Hall. When it is completed, a wide swath of downtown Los Angeles will bear the indelible stamp of its adopted son, Frank Gehry, and his restless imagination. In 2010, Vanity Fair magazine polled 52 of the world’s best-known architects and architectural critics, asking them to name the most significant works of architecture of the last 30 years. By an overwhelming margin they placed Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao at the top of the list.

WORKS

Guggenheim Museum Bilbao

Museo Guggenheim Bilbao

The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, along the Nervión River in downtown Bilbao

Established October 18, 1997
Location AbandoBilbao, Spain
Type Art museum
Visitor figures 1,002,963 (2007)
951,369 (2008)
Director Juan Ignacio Vidarte

 

 

Walt Disney Concert Hall

Location 111 South Grand Avenue
Los Angeles, CaliforniaU.S.
Type Concert hall
Built 1999–2003
Opened October 23, 2003
Construction cost $130 million (plus $110 million for parking garage)
Seating type Reserved
Capacity 2,265

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum

As viewed from the west, from the Washington Avenue Bridge

Established 1934
Location East BankUniversity of Minnesota,MinneapolisMinnesota
Type Art museum
Collection size 20,000+
Director Lyndel King
Public transit access Coffman Memorial UnionMetro Transit/SouthWest Transit

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Dancing House

Tančící dům

Side view

Former names Fred and Ginger

General information

Address Rašínovo nábřeží 80, 120 00 Praha 2
Town or city Prague
Country Czech Republic
Construction started 1992
Completed 1996

Design and construction

Architect Vlado MilunićFrank Gehry

 

 


The Vitra Design Museum building by Frank O. Gehry, front view

File:Vitra Design Museum, front view.jpg

 

 

Stata Center

 

 

 

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